Movie trailers from Super Bowl 50

While the actual football game was not bad, and many non-football fans will be discussing commercials, we here at ClutterStuff are talking about the new trailers that aired during Super Bowl 50.

Here are the ones that have been posted to YouTube as of this morning. When last night’s Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice spot appears, it will be added as well.

Deadpool (release date: 12 February 2016)

Captain America: Civil War (release date: 6 May 2016)

X-Men: Apocalypse (release date: 27 May 2016)

Independence Day: Resurgence (release date: 24 June 2016)

Jason Bourne (release date: 29 July 2016)

Checklist of Secret Wars II (1985-86) tie-in titles

It’s hard to believe that the Secret War II crossover event began thirty years ago this month—in July 1985. This was the first big crossover event in Marvel history, with parts of the story spreading out over nearly all of Marvel’s titles. Some critics don’t review the story very positively, but as a child of the 1980s reading the story in the 1980s, I loved it. Even the Beyonder’s mullet.

Here is a checklist of all of the Secret War II tie-in issues.

Chronological:

July 1985:

New Mutants #30
Captain America #308
Uncanny X-Men #196
Iron Man #197

August 1985:

Web of Spider-Man #6
Amazing Spider-Man #268
Fantastic Four #282

September 1985:

Daredevil #223
Incredible Hulk #312
Avengers #260

October 1985:

Dazzler #40
Alpha Flight #28
Rom #72
Avengers #261

November 1985:

Thing #30
Doctor Strange #74
Fantastic Four #285

December 1985:

Cloak and Dagger #4
Power Pack #18
Micronauts #16
Thor #363
Power Man and Iron Fist #121

January 1986:

New Mutants #36
Amazing Spider-Man #273
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man #111
Defenders #152
Uncanny X-Men #202

February 1986:

New Mutants #37
Amazing Spider-Man #274
Avengers #265
Uncanny X-Men #203
Fantastic Four #288

March 1986:

Avengers #266


Alphabetical:

Alpha Flight #28
Amazing Spider-Man #268
Amazing Spider-Man #273
Amazing Spider-Man #274
Avengers #260
Avengers #261
Avengers #265
Avengers #266
Captain America #308
Cloak and Dagger #4
Daredevil #223
Dazzler #40
Doctor Strange #74
Fantastic Four #282
Fantastic Four #285
Fantastic Four #288
Incredible Hulk #312
Iron Man #197
Micronauts #16
New Defenders #152
New Mutants #30
New Mutants #36
New Mutants #37
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man #111
Power Man and Iron Fist #121
Power Pack #18
Rom #72
Thing #30
Thor #363
Uncanny X-Men #196
Uncanny X-Men #202
Uncanny X-Men #203
Web of Spider-Man #6

Review: Uncanny Avengers (2015) nos. 1–5

Uncanny Avengers (2015) # 1–5
Writer: Rick Remender
Artist: Daniel Acuna

The High Evolutionary has always been one of my favorite and, in my humble opinion, far underused super villains. The last major storyline that he played a part in, as far as I can recall, was the “Evolutionary War” storyline that ran through the 1988 Marvel annuals.

The High Evolutionary left Earth for Counter-Earth (a duplicate planet sharing Earth’s orbit but always on the opposite side of the Sun) years ago. This five-issue mini-series follows Quicksilver on a trip to Counter-Earth in search of the true origins of his sister Scarlet Witch, and himself. A joint team of X-Men (Rogue, Sabretooth) and Avengers (Vision, Scarlet Witch, Captain America, Doctor Voodoo) pursue him to Counter-Earth.

There, the Unity Division is separated. Some are captured and others discover that the High Evolutionary has continue to develop the New Men, building and destroying entire civilizations in his quest for evolutionary perfection. The few survivors of this periodic mass extinction have set up a camp for themselves, under the leadership of one who calls himself the Low Evolutionary. The High Evolutionary has also created a super-powered woman named Luminous.

There are a number of interesting subplots among the various separated heroes as they work their way back together for the final battle with the High Evolutionary in issue 5. This review will not spoil everything, so please check out the issues on your own.

The “big reveal” of the series concerns the true origins of Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch. They are not the children of Magneto, though you can probably guess. Unlike some of the fan theories, they are not Inhumans either.

Another interesting aspect: there are a few interactions that may hint toward a new relationship between the Vision and the Scarlet Witch. Nothing is overt, and it might just be indicative of their friendship, but it might be indicative of something more.

I enjoyed the entire series. The story is fairly strong, though some of the subplots seem like filler material with no long-term effects. The art is very well done as well. Highly recommended.

#1 Published: January 28, 2015 Cover Artist: Daniel Acuna
#1 Published: 28 Jan. 2015
Cover Artist: Daniel Acuna
#2 Published: 25 Feb. 2015 Cover Artist: Daniel Acuna
#2 Published: 25 Feb. 2015
Cover Artist: Daniel Acuna
#3 Published: 1 Apr. 2015
Cover Artist: Daniel Acuna
#4 Published: 13 May 2015 Cover Artist: Leinil Francis Yu
#4 Published: 13 May 2015
Cover Artist: Leinil Francis Yu
#5 Published: 24 Jun. 2015 Cover Artist: Kris Anka
#5 Published: 24 Jun. 2015
Cover Artist: Kris Anka

When Marvel jumped the shark #80sComics

During the past week there has been quite a bit of controversy over Iceman’s retconned/alternate-continuity homosexuality. This reminds me of a number of other times that Marvel Comics has printed stories designed to stir up controversy.

Captain America quits!

Captain America vol. 1, no. 332 (August 1987)

Captain America 332To some degree foreshadowing parts of the “Civil War” plot, back in 1987, the Pentagon demanded that Steve Rogers (Captain America) become an official agent of the U. S. government. Rather than accept these terms, Rogers turned in his mask and shield, retiring as Captain America.

In the coming issues, another superhero called the Super-Patriot (John Walker) was appointed the new Captain America. Rogers would soon don a very cool-looking black version of the Captain America uniform and a different shield, and fight crime under the moniker of “The Captain.” Hey, the black costume worked for Spider-man (see below) so why not give it a shot with Cap?

Walker’s Captain America didn’t have the same moral code as Rogers, though, and was decidedly more violent and brutal. After killing a group of villains, Walker resigned and Rogers once again became Captain America (in issue no. 350). Walker eventually returned (to the West Coast Avengers) as “U. S. Agent,” wearing the black costume of “The Captain.” Though ultimately temporary, this change actually lasted 18 issues!

Gay Canadian super-hero?

Alpha Flight vol. 1, no. 106 (March 1992)

Alpha Flight 106The controversy over Iceman isn’t the first time that a super-hero’s sexuality was an issue. Twenty-three years ago, the first mainstream super-hero came out of the closet.

Northstar was a founding member of the Canadian super-team Alpha Flight. In this issue, he came out of the closet: quite literally announcing, “I’m gay.”

This was quite a big deal, because at that time, Marvel still adhered to the Comics Code Authority, which had only been revised to allow for the depiction of homosexuals in 1989. Neither Marvel or DC had yet taken advantage of this revision until Northstar.

On the other hand, the impact was (probably intentionally) minimal. Alpha Flight was not a terribly popular book, and the team only occasionally interacted with the other, American, super-heroes.

New looks

Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars no. 8 (December 1984) & Amazing Spider-Man vol. 1, no. 252

Fantastic Four vol. 1, no. 310 (January 1988)

Amazing Spiderman 252One of the most popular gimmicks in comics has been the dramatic costume change/update. Marvel did this with quite a few characters in the mid- to late-1980s.

secret-wars-8coverThe most famous, of course, was Spider-Man. Though gaining his new black costume during the mega-crossover event Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars, the costume made its first main-title appearance in issue 252 (May 1984), released a few months earlier.

Fantastic Four 310The black costume was so popular that, even after it was discovered to be a parasitic alien creature (not truly a “symbiote” as it was called), Spidey wore a cloth version for a while longer, while also occasionally also wearing his original blue and red design.

Another strange appearance change (or two) occurred in Fantastic Four. Ben Grimm’s Thing had always struggled with nature of his “power.” In 1988 he and Ms. Marvel were both zapped with cosmic rays, causing Ms. Marvel to turn into the Thing from the team’s early days, while Grimm developed sharper rocky growths on his body. Eventually they were healed and returned to normal.

Other appearance changes around this same time include Thor’s beard and the red-and-white Iron Man armor.

Mrs. Spider-Man

Amazing Spiderman Annual 21Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) Annual no. 21 (1987)

In 1987 Spidey married Mary Jane Watson. It was front-page news even in the mainstream press.

This issue also marked one of the first uses of variant cover art. One edition had Peter Parker and Mary Jane standing at the altar; the other had Spidey (in costume) and Mary Jane standing at the altar.

What do you think? Let me know in the comments what your favorite “jumping the shark” Marvel moment was, whether one of these or something else.